jump to navigation

Aristotle (384 BC – 322 BC) July 28, 2010

Posted by lapsippipm in new words.
trackback

Aristotle (384 BC – 322 BC)
Greek critic, philosopher, physicist, & zoologist


Education is the best provision for old age.

Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

Hope is a waking dream.

Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

I have gained this by philosophy: that I do without being commanded what others do only from fear of the law.

Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

Liars when they speak the truth are not believed.

Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

What is a friend? A single soul dwelling in two bodies.

Aristotle, from Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers

I count him braver who overcomes his desires than him who overcomes his enemies.

Aristotle, In Stobaeus, Florilegium

All men by nature desire knowledge.

Aristotle, Metaphysics

For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them.

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

It is possible to fail in many ways…while to succeed is possible only in one way.

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

One swallow does not make a summer.

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

Piety requires us to honor truth above our friends.

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

To be conscious that we are perceiving or thinking is to be conscious of our own existence.

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

To enjoy the things we ought and to hate the things we ought has the greatest bearing on excellence of character.

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

We make war that we may live in peace.

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

We must as second best…take the least of the evils.

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

With regard to excellence, it is not enough to know, but we must try to have and use it.

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

Without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods.

Aristotle, Nichomachean Ethics

In the arena of human life the honours and rewards fall to those who show their good qualities.

Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (4th c. BC)

In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.

Aristotle, Parts of Animals

Time crumbles things; everything grows old under the power of Time and is forgotten through the lapse of Time.

Aristotle, Physics

A state is not a mere society, having a common place, established for the prevention of mutual crime and for the sake of exchange…Political society exists for the sake of noble actions, and not of mere companionship.

Aristotle, Politics

Again, men in general desire the good, and not merely what their fathers had.

Aristotle, Politics

Even when laws have been written down, they ought not always to remain unaltered.

Aristotle, Politics

He who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficient for himself, must be either a beast or a god.

Aristotle, Politics

If liberty and equality, as is thought by some are chiefly to be found in democracy, they will be best attained when all persons alike share in the government to the utmost.

Aristotle, Politics

It is the nature of desire not to be satisfied, and most men live only for the gratification of it.

Aristotle, Politics

Law is order, and good law is good order.

Aristotle, Politics

Man is by nature a political animal.

Aristotle, Politics

Nature does nothing uselessly.

Aristotle, Politics

A constitution is the arrangement of magistracies in a state.
Aristotle

A friend to all is a friend to none.
Aristotle

A great city is not to be confounded with a populous one.
Aristotle

A sense is what has the power of receiving into itself the sensible forms of things without the matter, in the way in which a piece of wax takes on the impress of a signet-ring without the iron or gold.
Aristotle

A tragedy is a representation of an action that is whole and complete and of a certain magnitude. A whole is what has a beginning and middle and end.
Aristotle

A true friend is one soul in two bodies.
Aristotle

A tyrant must put on the appearance of uncommon devotion to religion. Subjects are less apprehensive of illegal treatment from a ruler whom they consider god-fearing and pious. On the other hand, they do less easily move against him, believing that he has the gods on his side.
Aristotle

All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire.
Aristotle

All men by nature desire knowledge.
Aristotle

All paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind.
Aristotle

All virtue is summed up in dealing justly.
Aristotle

Anybody can become angry – that is easy, but to be angry with the right person and to the right degree and at the right time and for the right purpose, and in the right way – that is not within everybody’s power and is not easy.
Aristotle

At his best, man is the noblest of all animals; separated from law and justice he is the worst.
Aristotle

Bad men are full of repentance.
Aristotle

Bashfulness is an ornament to youth, but a reproach to old age.
Aristotle

Both oligarch and tyrant mistrust the people, and therefore deprive them of their arms.
Aristotle

Bring your desires down to your present means. Increase them only when your increased means permit.
Aristotle

Change in all things is sweet.
Aristotle

Character may almost be called the most effective means of persuasion.
Aristotle

Courage is a mean with regard to fear and confidence.
Aristotle

Advertisements

Comments»

No comments yet — be the first.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: